2009

A Breakdown of Advertising Costs by Year and the Ratings

*Cost Per 30 Avg. Number of
Super Bowl Season Date Network Rating Share Second Spot Viewers
XLIV 2009 Feb 7 2010 * CBS tbd tbd tbd tbd
XLIII 2008 Feb 1 2009 * FOX 42.0 64 $3,000,000 98,732,000
XLII 2007 Feb 3 2008 * FOX 43.1 65 $2,699,963 97,448,000
XLI 2006 Feb 4 2007 * CBS 42.6 64 $2,385,365 93,184,000
XL 2005 Feb 5 2006 * ABC 41.6 62 $2,500,000 90,745,000
XXXIX 2004 Feb 6 2005 FOX 41.1 62 $2,400,000 86,072,000
XXXVIII 2003 Feb 1 2004 CBS 41.4 63 $2,302,200 89,795,000
XXXVII 2002 Jan 26 2003 ABC 40.7 61 $2,200,000 88,637,000
XXXVI 2001 Feb 3 2002 FOX 40.4 61 $2,200,000 86,801,000
XXXV 2000 Jan 28 2001 CBS 40.4 61 $2,200,000 84,335,000
XXXIV 1999 Jan 30 2000 ABC 43.3 63 $2,100,000 88,465,000
XXXIII 1998 Jan 31 1999 FOX 40.2 61 $1,600,000 83,720,000
XXXII 1997 Jan 25 1998 NBC 44.5 67 $1,291,100 90,000,000
XXXI 1996 Jan 26 1997 FOX 43.3 65 $1,200,000 87,870,000
XXX 1995 Jan 28 1996 NBC 46.0 68 $1,085,000 94,080,000
XXIX 1994 Jan 29 1995 ABC 41.3 62 $1,150,000 83,420,000
XXVIII 1993 Jan 30 1994 NBC 45.5 66 $900,000 90,000,000
XXVII 1992 Jan 31 1993 NBC 45.1 66 $850,000 90,990,000
XXVI 1991 Jan 26 1992 CBS 40.3 61 $850,000 79,590,000
XXV 1990 Jan 27 1991 ABC 41.9 63 $800,000 79,510,000
XXIV 1989 Jan 28 1990 CBS 39.0 63 $700,400 73,852,000
XXIII 1988 Jan 22 1989 NBC 43.5 68 $675,000 81,590,000
XXII 1987 Jan 31 1988 ABC 41.9 62 $645,000 80,140,000
XXI 1986 Jan 25 1987 CBS 45.8 66 $600,000 87,190,000
XX 1985 Jan 26 1986 NBC 48.3 70 $550,000 92,570,000
XIX 1984 Jan 20 1985 ABC 46.4 63 $525,000 85,530,000
XVIII 1983 Jan 22 1984 CBS 46.4 71 $368,200 77,620,000
XVII 1982 Jan 30 1983 NBC 48.6 69 $400,000 81,770,000
XVI 1981 Jan 24 1982 CBS 49.1 73 $324,300 85,240,000
XV 1980 Jan 25 1981 NBC 44.4 63 $275,000 68,290,000
XIV 1979 Jan 20 1980 CBS 46.3 67 $222,000 76,240,000
XIII 1978 Jan 21 1979 NBC 47.1 74 $185,000 74,740,000
XII 1977 Jan 15 1978 CBS 47.2 67 $162,300 78,940,000
XI 1976 Jan 09 1977 NBC 44.4 73 $125,000 62,050,000
X 1975 Jan 18 1976 CBS 42.3 78 $110,000 57,710,000
IX 1974 Jan 12 1975 NBC 42.4 72 $107,000 56,050,000
VIII 1973 Jan 13 1974 CBS 41.6 73 $103,500 51,700,000
VII 1972 Jan 14 1973 NBC 42.7 72 $88,100 53,320,000
VI 1971 Jan 16 1972 CBS 44.2 74 $86,100 56,640,000
V 1970 Jan 17 1971 NBC 39.9 75 $72,500 46,040,000
IV 1969 Jan 11 1970 CBS 39.4 69 $78,200 44,270,000
III 1968 Jan 12 1969 NBC 36.0 70 $55,000 41,660,000
II 1967 Jan 14 1968 CBS 36.8 68 $54,500 39,120,000
I 1966 Jan 15 1967 CBS 22.6 43 $42,500 26,750,000
I 1966 Jan 15 1967 NBC 18.5 36 $37,500 24,430,000

Source: Nielsen Media Research

How to Boost Your Super Bowl ROI

Consider that $3 million you just dropped on a 30-second Super Bowl spot a waste of money — unless you’ve got a smart, calculated search-and-social-media strategy behind it.

Last year, the ads from the big game racked up 99.5 million collective online views and 98.7 million people watched the game on TV.

“Social media provides a longer shelf life for people’s campaigns,” said Anthony Iaffaldano, senior director-strategy and innovation at Reprise Media. “It’s about who’s got a plan in place to take the equity they’re building through all this activity and activate it after the game. Social media becomes more valuable as you continue to engage.”

About 90% of brands had their Super Bowl ads up on YouTube in 2009, estimates a Google executive, although that’s just the bare minimum. A quarter of the brands in the Bowl tapped social networks to try to drive additional comments, ratings and conversation. And more than two-thirds bought paid-search ads against their brands or products.

Super Bowl Ad Buys: Social Media Will Impact Marketers’ Decisions

Increased digital word-of-mouth marketing — using social media and other platforms — could shift marketers’ media plan dynamics for next February’s Super Bowl. Pete Blackshaw, executive vice president of digital strategic services, and Randall Beard, executive vice president and general manager of Nielsen IAG, write that “earned media” — material from social-networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook — “will be a huge test, as the new reality of consumer expression” for next year’s big football game. For instance, Tweets embedded in Facebook feeds, blog entries and Google search results can have long-term value. They say these efforts, in conjunction with Super Bowl ads, can have a “latency” effect and provide brands with an almost endless annuity of “earned media.” Nielsen cites the example of Nationwide Insurance, which three years ago ran a Super Bowl commercial featuring ex-Britney Spears husband Kevin Federline that grabbed over $20 million dollars in “earned media.”

Advertisers keep their heads in the game

In the advertising world, building buzz is the pregame game. Coca-Cola is readying an update to the Mean Joe Greene commercial featuring Troy Polamalu and his bountiful hair. (Coca-Cola did not return calls seeking confirmation.) “Everybody’s been waiting for the next Mean Joe spot,” says Bob Horowitz, the executive producer of Super Bowls’ Greatest Commercials, adding that Mr. Polamalu is known for his charisma and not his crankiness.

Bruce Springsteen Admits Super Bowl Gig Was Done To Spur Ticket Sales

http://tinyurl.com/y87k4h3 Bruce Springsteen shed light on why after years of turning the NFL’s Super Bowl requests down flat, he broke tradition and performed with the E Street Band during the halftime spectacle. He explained to The Los Angeles Times, "I’ve said no for about 10 years or however long they’ve been asking, but, I tell you, we played on the…

Super Bowl economics are adding up

Local Super Bowl organizers are celebrating a different kind of victory two months after the historic matchup between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Arizona Cardinals. More than 130 area businesses landed $3.96 million in Super Bowl business as part of the Emerging Business Program.

Watch your favorite 2009 Super Bowl ads

USA TODAY’s Ad Meter tracks the second-by-second responses of a panel of viewers to ads during the Super Bowl and Ranks them from best to worst. ‘Two nobodies from nowhere’ craft winning Super Bowl ad.

Scoring the 2009 Super Bowl Ads

Bud Light in particular was very disappointing after so many great spots in the past. The spot where an office worker was thrown out a window for suggesting no more beer at meetings should have been shot down in the first agency presentation and the whole “Drinkability” approach is a non starter. One has to wonder if this is the alternative to the “non-drinkable” regular Budweiser.

Likewise, the Bud Light “Party starter” spot with Conan was pretty embarrassing, as was the skiing spot. Making skiers wreck with fake trees was another example of bad, undrinkable slapstick.

Times may change, but Super Bowl ads don’t

With the economy in the doldrums and the nation’s future uncertain, it’s nice to know that some things never change.

Among them: Super Bowl advertisers continue to rely on hot women, violent gags and sophomoric humor to sell their wares.

While this year’s batch of Super Bowl ads offered a lot of the predictable fodder, there were some bright spots. Here’s a look at Ads of the Weird’s take on the best and the worst of this year’s Super Bowl spots.

Super Bowl ads deliver big laughs

For a country that needs some economic stimulus, the 2009 Super Bowl did its best. The commercials weren’t the best ever, but they tried to be as big and bold as those from better times. There were romantic Clydesdales, soda-stealing bugs and a hilarious cameo by the rear end of a moose. The laughs mostly outweighed the winces. And if the ads could make you smile during this financial crisis, there’s hope for us all. The halftime show was even more optimistic as Bruce Springsteen and his E Street Band set off musical fireworks (accompanied by real ones) that were soul-stirring enough to make everyone believe we can get back to our glory days. And did we mention the game was exciting?

Beer out as top Super Bowl ad

U.S. tire maker Bridgestone’s Potatoheads commercial was voted the favorite product pitch aired during the Super Bowl Sunday in the ninth annual ADBOWL.

The ad, featuring Potatohead toys driving a car equipped with Bridgestone tires, was the first non-beer commercial to grab the top spot in six years, said Steve McKee, president of the media services firm McKee Wallwork Cleveland and founder of ADBOWL.

Lippert’s Super Bowl Ad Critique

Denny’s, Pedigree, E*Trade and job sites score. Free stuff. And public service. That’s what I think viewers are looking for in this Super Bowl of our economic discontent.

MSNBC picks the top 10 Super Bowl ads of all time

Below are our choices for the 10 best Super Bowl ads of all time. The picks were heavily influenced by commenters on the MSNBC message boards, who discussed their favorite commercials and voted on the subject two years ago. We also considered the economic impact of the ads, which mostly consisted of disqualifying failed dot-com companies.