2001

HomeAway Prepares to Launch National Integrated Marketing Campaign Based on ‘National Lampoon’s Vacation’

Campaign kicks off Super Bowl Sunday with debut of mock movie trailer style commercial featuring Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo reprising their roles as Clark and Ellen Griswold

Ad provides sneak peek of a new short film about the Griswolds

Integrated campaign includes national television and online ads, social media, and a microsite that incorporates the film, a game, and user-generated content for a national consumer promotion

A Breakdown of Advertising Costs by Year and the Ratings

*Cost Per 30 Avg. Number of
Super Bowl Season Date Network Rating Share Second Spot Viewers
XLIV 2009 Feb 7 2010 * CBS tbd tbd tbd tbd
XLIII 2008 Feb 1 2009 * FOX 42.0 64 $3,000,000 98,732,000
XLII 2007 Feb 3 2008 * FOX 43.1 65 $2,699,963 97,448,000
XLI 2006 Feb 4 2007 * CBS 42.6 64 $2,385,365 93,184,000
XL 2005 Feb 5 2006 * ABC 41.6 62 $2,500,000 90,745,000
XXXIX 2004 Feb 6 2005 FOX 41.1 62 $2,400,000 86,072,000
XXXVIII 2003 Feb 1 2004 CBS 41.4 63 $2,302,200 89,795,000
XXXVII 2002 Jan 26 2003 ABC 40.7 61 $2,200,000 88,637,000
XXXVI 2001 Feb 3 2002 FOX 40.4 61 $2,200,000 86,801,000
XXXV 2000 Jan 28 2001 CBS 40.4 61 $2,200,000 84,335,000
XXXIV 1999 Jan 30 2000 ABC 43.3 63 $2,100,000 88,465,000
XXXIII 1998 Jan 31 1999 FOX 40.2 61 $1,600,000 83,720,000
XXXII 1997 Jan 25 1998 NBC 44.5 67 $1,291,100 90,000,000
XXXI 1996 Jan 26 1997 FOX 43.3 65 $1,200,000 87,870,000
XXX 1995 Jan 28 1996 NBC 46.0 68 $1,085,000 94,080,000
XXIX 1994 Jan 29 1995 ABC 41.3 62 $1,150,000 83,420,000
XXVIII 1993 Jan 30 1994 NBC 45.5 66 $900,000 90,000,000
XXVII 1992 Jan 31 1993 NBC 45.1 66 $850,000 90,990,000
XXVI 1991 Jan 26 1992 CBS 40.3 61 $850,000 79,590,000
XXV 1990 Jan 27 1991 ABC 41.9 63 $800,000 79,510,000
XXIV 1989 Jan 28 1990 CBS 39.0 63 $700,400 73,852,000
XXIII 1988 Jan 22 1989 NBC 43.5 68 $675,000 81,590,000
XXII 1987 Jan 31 1988 ABC 41.9 62 $645,000 80,140,000
XXI 1986 Jan 25 1987 CBS 45.8 66 $600,000 87,190,000
XX 1985 Jan 26 1986 NBC 48.3 70 $550,000 92,570,000
XIX 1984 Jan 20 1985 ABC 46.4 63 $525,000 85,530,000
XVIII 1983 Jan 22 1984 CBS 46.4 71 $368,200 77,620,000
XVII 1982 Jan 30 1983 NBC 48.6 69 $400,000 81,770,000
XVI 1981 Jan 24 1982 CBS 49.1 73 $324,300 85,240,000
XV 1980 Jan 25 1981 NBC 44.4 63 $275,000 68,290,000
XIV 1979 Jan 20 1980 CBS 46.3 67 $222,000 76,240,000
XIII 1978 Jan 21 1979 NBC 47.1 74 $185,000 74,740,000
XII 1977 Jan 15 1978 CBS 47.2 67 $162,300 78,940,000
XI 1976 Jan 09 1977 NBC 44.4 73 $125,000 62,050,000
X 1975 Jan 18 1976 CBS 42.3 78 $110,000 57,710,000
IX 1974 Jan 12 1975 NBC 42.4 72 $107,000 56,050,000
VIII 1973 Jan 13 1974 CBS 41.6 73 $103,500 51,700,000
VII 1972 Jan 14 1973 NBC 42.7 72 $88,100 53,320,000
VI 1971 Jan 16 1972 CBS 44.2 74 $86,100 56,640,000
V 1970 Jan 17 1971 NBC 39.9 75 $72,500 46,040,000
IV 1969 Jan 11 1970 CBS 39.4 69 $78,200 44,270,000
III 1968 Jan 12 1969 NBC 36.0 70 $55,000 41,660,000
II 1967 Jan 14 1968 CBS 36.8 68 $54,500 39,120,000
I 1966 Jan 15 1967 CBS 22.6 43 $42,500 26,750,000
I 1966 Jan 15 1967 NBC 18.5 36 $37,500 24,430,000

Source: Nielsen Media Research

Rookies Interfere With Super Bowl Ads

by Andrew Keen

It’s amateur hour at the Super Bowl this year. On Sunday, 90 million television viewers on CBS will be subjected to commercials made by “You” — Time magazine’s Person of The Year for 2006. Three Super Bowl XLI advertisers — Doritos, the National Football League, and Chevrolet — will all be running 30-second commercial spots made by amateurs. The Web 2.0 revolution in user-generated content has infiltrated the American living room. These amateur creators, who Time praise as “people formerly known as consumers,” are now providing the entertainment at the biggest event in the media calendar.This is not good news. The shift from professionally produced to user-generated advertising makes us poorer in both economic and cultural terms. The arrival of user-created commercials at Super Bowl XLI represents the American Idolization of traditional entertainment — the degeneration of professional content into a “talent show” for amateurs.

We, the conventional television audience, are certainly losers in this new fashion for user-generated advertisements. We have traditionally watched Super Bowl commercials to be entertained by memorable ads. Often, these commercials are more memorable than the game. Occasionally, they even represent significant cultural moments in American history. Few of us, for example, can remember who won Super Bowl in 1984 (Los Angeles Raiders 38, Washington Redskins 9), where it was played (Tampa), or who sang the national anthem (Barry Manilow). But most of us can remember the Chiat/Day produced, Ridley Scott directed, commercial for the Macintosh computer, with its Orwellian subtext and its indelible explanation of why “1984 wasn’t going to be like 1984.”

The 10 best Super Bowl ads of all time – Business of Super Bowl

Thirty-four years ago this month, Farrah Fawcett sensuously applied Noxzema to Joe Namath’s manly chin — touching off an escalating arms race of expensive Super Bowl commercials that have frequently been more entertaining than the games.

Last year, advertisers weren’t shy about spending $2.5 million on a 30-second commercial, but only the Budweiser “Magic Fridge” commercial came within striking distance of our Top 10 list.

Below are the best Super Bowl commercials of all time, the keys to their success and the prospects of the company after the spot aired. As you can see, just because people are still talking about an ad more than 20 years later doesn’t mean the product changed the world:

10. Budweiser “Frogs” (1995)
9. Xerox “Monks” (1977)
8. Tabasco “Mosquito” (1998)
7. Electronic Data Systems “Herding Cats” (2000)
6. McDonald’s “The Showdown” (1993)
5. Monster.com “When I Grow Up …” (1999)
4. Reebok “Terry Tate: Office Linebacker” (2003)
3. E*Trade “Monkey” (2000)
2. Coke “Mean Joe Greene” (1979)
1. Apple “1984” (1984)

SUPER BOWL GAMES VS. COMMERCIALS / Are ads superior to game?

“The Super Bowl ads are better than the game.”

No doubt you’ve heard at least one friend or relative make that statement, usually after a few drinks, a large gambling loss or a horrible set of Super Bowl events that mock the sports gods — such as Washington quarterback Mark Rypien being named MVP.

But have we really reached the point where commercials have become more entertaining than the sporting event that surrounds them?

Super Bowl ad clutter hurting recall

Clutter is a headache for media people under any circumstances, making it harder for an advertiser’s message to stand out. And when you’re paying a record $2.6 million to deliver that message, as are those advertisers with spots in this year’s Super Bowl on CBS, it’s even more of a concern. According to a report released late last week by TNS Media Intelligence, the Super Bowl has become more cluttered than ever. Last year’s game on ABC contained a record 47.2 minutes of ads, nearly four more minutes than Fox had the previous year. That includes promotions for the Super Bowl carrier’s own shows, a category that has exploded over the past five years. In 2001, the Super Bowl carrier ran 5 minutes and 55 seconds of self-promotion. Last year that soared to 10 minutes and 25 seconds. TNS also found that over the past 20 years, the Super Bowl has run more than 11 full hours of commercials for 221 advertisers, representing an investment of $1.72 billion.

Two decades of Super Bowl ad sales total $1.6 billion

Commercial advertising time in the Super Bowl has steadily gotten more expensive, generating well over $1 billion in sales for the broadcast networks over the last two decades, according to data released on Wednesday.

In the 20 Super Bowls played since 1986, the networks have carried 717 minutes, or roughly 12 hours, of advertising during game broadcasts a combined value of almost $1.6 billion, said TNS Media Intelligence, an ad-tracking firm.

There have been more than 1,400 ads from 227 different marketers over that time period, and the top five spenders accounted for roughly one-third of the total.

Super Bowl Ads Lead to Bigger Box Office

http://www.adweek.com/aw/regional/west/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000789762 By Gregory Solman LOS ANGELES A study of Super Bowl advertising effectiveness shows that movies marketed during the big game perform 40 percent better at the box office than films that are not. The report by Rama Yelkur, Chuck Tomkovick and Patty Traczyk, of the marketing department of the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, was first published in the…

Super Bowl XXXIX – Movie ads do register

http://www.sportsbusinessnews.com/index.asp?story_id=43884 Spending millions to advertise in the Feb. 6 Super Bowl will likely pay off for Hollywood’s movie studios, say marketing experts at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, who have studied Super Bowl advertising for five years. Advertisements during the high-profile game are selling for an average of $2.4 million per 30-second spot, a record amount for the National Football…

Why the Super Bowl? They have their reasons

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6882052/ At $4.8 million a minute, obscure advertisers hope to score big By Martin Wolk MSNBC Tune in to the Super Bowl Sunday and you can be certain of seeing the usual quota of slick and humorous ads from mainstays of the game including Budweiser, Pepsi-Cola, Subway and Frito-Lay. But you might be surprised by little-known newcomers who hope to…

Super Bowl ad money likely to pay off

http://www.nwherald.com/StyleSection/313174661107154.php NORTHWEST HERALD EAU CLAIRE, Wis. – Spending millions to advertise in the Feb. 6 Super Bowl will likely pay off for Hollywood’s movie studios, say marketing experts at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, who have studied Super Bowl advertising for five years. Advertisements during the high-profile game are selling for an average of $2.4 million per 30-second spot, a…

Super Bowl Ads Seek Smiles, But Where’s the Hype?

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=entertainmentNews&storyID=7414083 By Michele Gershberg NEW YORK (Reuters) – Call it the ripple effect, or the nipple effect, but Super Bowl advertisers have eased off the hoopla ahead of the National Football League championship game this year following an indecency scandal last year. Less than two weeks before the big U.S. game on Feb. 6, few advertisers have trumpeted their plans…

Lawmakers cite Super Bowl halftime show in demands to stop indecency

Janet Jackson’s exposed breast was talk of Capitol Hill on Wednesday, with lawmakers and regulators saying it’s the latest example of all that’s wrong with TV and should serve as the impetus for government to get tough with broadcasters.

At a pair of hearings, lawmakers excoriated Mel Karmazin, president of Viacom Inc. His company owns CBS, which broadcast the raunchy Super Bowl halftime show that included Jackson.

Members of the House Telecommunications Committee spent more than two hours grilling Karmazin, who again apologized for the show that ended with singer Justin Timberlake tearing off part of Jackson’s top and exposing her right breast to 90 million TV viewers.